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What's the difference?

What's the difference? Topic: What's the difference?
May 26, 2019 / By Deye
Question: What's the difference between Vegan and Raw Foodist? Is it easy to be a Raw Foodist? What can They eat and what can they eat? =) I meant what can they eat and what can't they eat haha =)
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Best Answers: What's the difference?

Beverley Beverley | 6 days ago
Vegan people do not eat/use any animal products because they do not want to exploit animals. Raw foodists eat most of their food uncooked because they are trying to be healthier than everyone else or make themselves healthier than they were before.
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Beverley Originally Answered: What is the difference between AIDS and HIV?
the difference between HIV and AIDS is HIV is the virus that may cause AIDS. HIV belongs to a subset of viruses called retroviruses or slow virus. This is because it is a progressive disease. HIV is entered through the body through the mucous membranes or thru blood to blood contact. Once you get the virus it slowly begins to attack the immune system, killing off healthy immune system cells. The deterioration and destruction of immune function leads to AIDS.
Beverley Originally Answered: What is the difference between AIDS and HIV?
Well, HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus and AIDS (Acquired Immune deficiency Syndrome). I do not know much about it, but AIDS is after a person with HIV becomes ill with other conditions (eg. tuberculosis) and then has AIDS because any single condition that is contracted by a person who is HIV positive can set this into full blown AIDS and in turn kill the person because of immunity or lack there of.

Abnor Abnor
A vegan uses no animal products and strives to live a life free of animal exploitation. It's largely an ethical thing. A raw foodist believes all foods have enzymes, and they are killed if the food is heated above a certain temperature. Problem is, there's not really a consensus of what that temperature is. Most raw foodists are vegan, eating only fruits, vegetables, nuts, and sprouted grains and beans; but I have heard of some who consume small amounts of raw milk or raw meat. It's primarily a health thing.
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Sloan Sloan
raw foodist will eat primarily uncooked food. Really tough to do, more so than vegans. Vegans don't eat any animal products (no eggs, milk, meat, etc), but do cook their food. My friend tried to do a raw food diet. He was miserable. He just got bored with the same flavors. Also, unless you live in a place with good produce year-round, good flavored food will be hard to find in the winter.
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Sloan Originally Answered: What's the difference between Wolves and Coyotes?
Wolves and coyotes are different species. There are three species of wolf - the grey wolf (Canis lupus), which is the species most people think of when they hear the word 'wolf', the red wolf (Canis rufus) and the Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis). There is only one species of coyote (Canis latrans). The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) of South America is inappropriately named - it is not a wolf, and is only distantly related to other canids, hence its being placed in its own genus. The grey wolf is found throughout North America and Eurasia in a wide range of habitats, and has numerous subspecies including the European wolf (C. l. lupus), Canadian wolf (C. l. occidentalis), Alaskan wolf (C. l. pambasileus), Arctic wolf (C. l. arctos), Mexican wolf (C. l. baileyi), Iberian wolf (C. l. signatus) and Arabian wolf (C. l. arabs). It is the largest member of the family Canidae at up to 175lb. They are highly variable in colour and can be grey, black, white, brown or any combination of these. All individuals of the Arctic subspecies are white. They live in packs, which are family groups, led by a dominant pair called the alpha male and female. These two are the pack's only breeding pair. The rest of the pack is made up of their siblings and/or offspring. Most packs have less than 10 members, though up to 30 has been known. They are able to take large prey such as moose or bison by working together. The red wolf is found only in the south-eastern US, and weighs a maximum of 90lb - it is intermediate in size between a grey wolf and a coyote. It is generally more reddish in colour than either the grey wolf or the coyote, though this is variable. It has a similar social system to the grey wolf, but does not rely on group hunting to such an extent - red wolves often hunt singly or in pairs for small prey, though they will work as a team to bring down larger game such as white-tailed deer. The Ethiopian wolf, as the name suggests, is found only in Ethiopia. It weighs only about 40lb, and though it lives in a pack, each individual hunts small prey such as rodents for itself. It is a sandy-yellow colour, and looks less 'wolf-like' than either the grey wolf or red wolf, with a narrow, pointed muzzle and larger ears. It was once thought to be a species of jackal, and was called the Simien jackal, but genetic analysis shows it to be more closely related to the wolves than the jackals. The coyote is found only in North America. It is a smaller animal than a wolf, weighing up to 35lb. It is greyish-brown in colour, with larger, more pointed ears and a narrower, more pointed muzzle than either the grey or red wolf. It often lives in pairs, and may occasionally form small packs. It mostly hunts small prey, but packs can take down larger animals. It is highly adaptable and is often found in urban areas, making a good living off the waste food humans throw away - if you see a dog-like animal in a city, it's highly unlikely to be a wolf (wolves are extremely shy and wary of humans), but it could well be a coyote or a fox (or a stray dog, of course). All members of the genus Canis - wolves, dogs, coyotes, jackals and dingoes - can interbreed and produce fertile young, showing that they are very closely related. Indeed, the red wolf was once believed to be a grey wolf-coyote hybrid, rather than a species in its own right. However, wolves, particularly grey wolves, usually see coyotes as competitors, and kill them. Here are some images: Grey wolf: http://jon-atkinson.com/Large%20Images/L... Red wolf: http://www.tenan.vuurwerk.nl/reports/mar... Ethiopian wolf: http://www.canids.org/gallery/Popup19370... Coyote: http://tipt3.utoledo.edu/starters/coyote/coyote2a.jpg

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