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Microwaving Plastic realse chemicals and toxins into the food?

Microwaving Plastic realse chemicals and toxins into the food? Topic: Microwaving Plastic realse chemicals and toxins into the food?
July 20, 2019 / By Devil
Question: So dose it realse **** into our food? I personally think it dose, My 60 years old grandma is so stupid when it comes to health hazards she microwaves food in zip locks, plastic bowl, plastic wrappers, plastic wrap, styrophome, plastic packaging, platic cups and tuppaware. I told her already never to put plastic in the microwave but she dose anyways.
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Best Answers: Microwaving Plastic realse chemicals and toxins into the food?

Berry Berry | 10 days ago
You are right to tell her that. But be respectful and don't call her stupid. Most older people assume since a product is made for food storage that it is safe. I was caring for an elderly lady with lupus one day and she asked me to heat her a cup of water in the microwave for her green tea. She was using a plastic cup every day to do that. I told her about chemicals and that they may be affecting her lupus and never to use plastic in the microwave, something like Corelle is safe, even ceramics and plates made in China are not safe these days because the glaze may contain lead. My best friend also heats tofu in the plastic carton it comes in. She has so many sicknesses. I tried to tell her not to do that, but she is hard-headed. So it is not confined to old people. I won't use styrofoam at all, it is made from petroleum and even something healthy like vinegar or lemon juice in a cup of tea in that stuff will leach the chemicals right out of it.
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Berry Originally Answered: What chemicals are used in natural food dyes?
Most of the dyes that are available commercially for food , the textile industry or any other application are synthetic versions of what were originally natural dyes. Large industrial empires have been started by chemists producing an industrial type of a dye previously obtained from natural sources. BASF for example began by the synthesis of indigo. Chemists have improved on the natural dyes, not only in having a product that is consistent in quality and strength , but also by modifying the molecule so as to improve characteristics such as solubility , light fastness , wash resistance , etc. A direct food example is the yellow colourant used in yellow margarine , as a feed additive for poultry to make the yolks yellower. This compound is ß-carotene which is synthesised industrially. Carotene is the substance in carrots that colours them orange and is the most common form of carotene in plants. When used as a food colouring, it has the E number E160a. The structure was deduced by Karrer et al. in 1930. In nature, β-carotene is a precursor (inactive form) to vitamin A via the action of beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase. Isolation of β-carotene from fruits abundant in carotenoids is commonly done using column chromatography. ß- carotene is an organic compound and chemically is classified as a hydrocarbon and specifically as a terpenoid (isoprenoid), reflecting its derivation from isoprene units. β-Carotene is biosynthesized from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. What you are proposing is already being carried out on a large scale, and very few naturally occurring colourants for food or industry are available today. Nearly all synthetic dyes are based on naturally occurring precursors.
Berry Originally Answered: What chemicals are used in natural food dyes?
Read this article at the US FDA website: http://www.fda.gov/food/foodingredientsp... "... Colors that are exempt from certification include pigments derived from natural sources such as vegetables, minerals or animals. Nature derived color additives are typically more expensive than certified colors and may add unintended flavors to foods. Examples of exempt colors include annatto extract (yellow), dehydrated beets (bluish-red to brown), caramel (yellow to tan), beta-carotene (yellow to orange) and grape skin extract (red, green). ..." I think that paragraph pretty much answers your question. As is typical in business (and food is a business), it's a matter of money for the most part.

Abishai Abishai
A doctor on TV said that the more pliable the plastic, the worse it is to microwave, so Zip Loc bags and plastic wrap should definitely not go in the microwave; Tupperware is less harmful. Your grandmother probably thinks that at her age, if it hasn't killed her yet, it won't! You can buy her microwavable glass dishes for Christmas or her next birthday and hope she uses it.
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Sive Sive
well, back when granny got her microwave, plastic was the modern miracle utensil to use in the microwave. Every store sold it to use like that. This 56 year old granny does it too. Next year something else will kill us. So does worrying about whats going to kill us next. Your granny is NOT stupid. shame on you for saying that.
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Sive Originally Answered: Paper or Plastic, and Why?
Other, I use the canvas reusable bags - better for the enviroment and also you don't have 9 million empty bags taking up space in a closet.

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