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Does cake flour have less carbs than all purpose flour?

Does cake flour have less carbs than all purpose flour? Topic: Does cake flour have less carbs than all purpose flour?
April 19, 2019 / By Carlisle
Question: I found a recipe for low carb sugar cookies that uses cake flour, but I don't have any. If I used all purpose flour instead, would that raise the carbs?
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Best Answers: Does cake flour have less carbs than all purpose flour?

Allaster Allaster | 6 days ago
no there will be the same number of carb but the main difference is the texture of the flour. cake flour is lighter and will make the cookies more fluffy. if you use all purpose you may end up with a hard flat cookie.
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Allaster Originally Answered: Seasoned flour question?
Dealing with raw chicken, i would throw it out, its better to be safe than sorry! i have to do the same thing,(toss it) i make my own seasoned flour too....ok, brain storm just hit! lol, ...make your normal seasoned flour as usual, and put a little in a bowl or bag at a time,to coat your chicken.... and what you don't use,(The flour that chicken hasn't touched) seal & put in the refrigerator for next time.
Allaster Originally Answered: Seasoned flour question?
Could the flour be used for gravy? I've done that or for thickening soups or stews. Because the flour was used with raw meat, I would keep it in the fridge, but only for a week to be on the safe side. Another idea is to make the batch of seasoned flour, then pour out what you need to make the oven baked chicken. The rest is not exposed to raw meat, then should not be a problem to reuse it much later. ----

Tawnee Tawnee
They are about the same carb content. Always check serving sizes when looking at nutritional info. The site mentioned above has different serving sizes for the two items.
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Robbie Robbie
it will actually be less, the following is from dlife.com white cake flour Carbs: 85.1g Calories: 394.6 Saturated Fat: 0.1g Sodium: 2.2mg white all purpose flour Carbs: 23.8g Calories: 113.8 Saturated Fat: 0g Sodium: 0.6mg
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Robbie Originally Answered: What are some GOOD Low Carb substitutes for flour?
Low Carb Flour Several ingredients are used for low carb baking to replace the regular flour used in most conventional recipes. Which you use depends on a number of factors: - how low a carb count you are aiming for, - what consistency and texture you want in the finished product, - what kind of glycemic threshold (the extent to which your blood sugar level is elevated & for how long) you must maintain. All flour substitutes have carbs. All of them will therefore affect your blood glucose level. For most of us, it is desirable to maintain as low a carb count and glycemic impact as possible. Low carbers need not worry ONLY about the number of carbs they ingest, but the type, and how they affect their blood sugar, since that affects whether we lose, maintain or gain weight. There are a number of substances which are called "flour" but do not share any or all of the properties like 'Gold Medal' or 'King Arthur' flour most of us were used to using pre-Atkins. Some of these "flours" are ground from food items other than grains. Many can be more accurately referred to as 'meal' rather than 'flour'. Grain flours sometimes used in LC recipes: oat, whole wheat, high gluten, vital wheat gluten. They are relatively high in carbs and have a pretty high glycemic index, so therefore are not appropriate for those who are metabolically challenged / insulin resistent. Soy flour is derived from soy beans. It has a distinctive taste which many people find objectionable. It is lighter / fluffier than grain flours. It does not have any leavening properties. Almond flour (also called almond 'meal') is finely ground almonds. There are other nut 'flours' / meals available commercially. You can make your own, but in my experience, it's a pain to do and hard to achieve the overall fine consistency without a professional grade food mill. There's also the problem of getting a little too carried away and ending up with nut "butter" ;-) They are incredibly rich, high in fiber, high in fat. These nut meals do not have any flour properties, do not "rise" when baked, for instance. They are wonderful as flour substitutes in cakes, muffins, cookies. A book for flourless baking that relies primarily on nut flours: "Fabulous & Flourless: 150 Wheatless and Dairy-Free Desserts : Cakes, Tarts, Tortes, Roulades, Puddings, Souffles, Cookies, and More" by Mary Wachtel Mauksch. Protein powder is another substitute for flour, but the least viable in my opinion. It is not always made of soy. In fact, most consider the soy protein powders the least desirable. IMO it's a poor substitute because it is so lightweight, doesn't add enough substance to batters / cookies, tends to make things too dry and insubstantial. It is best used in combination with another flour substitute. Flax seed meal is a great flour substitute because of the high fiber content. It is nutrient dense, has more Omega 3 fatty acids than salmon, and it has 'substance'. Bake Mix Options Many low carb recipes, both on the Atkins Center website and other, private recipe sites, call for Atkins Bake mix as an ingredient. However, it's very expensive. Happily, there are several alternatives: - Aunt Pearl's Low Carb Bake Mix; 24oz cannister available at www.lowcarbgrocery.com - Carbolite bake mix (zero carbs) Available at most of the large lowcarb vendor sites such as www.low-carb.com Homemade: Bake Mix #1 1 cup soy flour 2 cups protein powder 2 Tbl baking powder 1 tsp salt 2 Tbl Splenda >>>> Bake Mix #2 1.5 cups protein powder (unflavored is best, but vanilla will do) 1.5 cups vital wheat gluten flour 2 Tbl baking powder 1 tsp salt 2 Tbl Splenda >>>> locarbman's Flour / Bake Mix substitute 2 parts vital wheat gluten (24 carbs/cup [Bob's Red Mill brand]) 1 part oat flour (48 carbs/cup)

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