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Trying to gain weight on type 2 diabetes?

Trying to gain weight on type 2 diabetes? Topic: Trying to gain weight on type 2 diabetes?
July 21, 2019 / By Branden
Question: I've been a type 2 diabetic for the last 5 years and would like to gain some muscle weight but cannot as my diet restricts carbs. I'm on meltformin 850mg twice a day as my medication. Should I be on other medication as well or is there any other foods which I can have in larger quatitities?
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Best Answers: Trying to gain weight on type 2 diabetes?

Adlai Adlai | 7 days ago
As mentioned earlier, carbs have nothing to do with building muscle... it's protein that builds muscle. I would add that the quality of protein matters as well. Avoid beef and dairy, trust me, they're the last things a diabetic needs. Stick with high quality proteins found in chicken breast and fish. Cold water salmon is nearly ideal. Read my diabetes info page for more info. You shouldn't have to be taking that much Metformin. I only take 500 mg and sometimes none depending on my sugar level. My fasting is typically 95, or so. It's all about diet, exercise, weight management, and a few supplements. Read more on my diabetes info page: http://www.geocities.com/seabulls69/Type...
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Adlai Originally Answered: type 1 diabetes, will juice cause weight gain?
Juices are a lot of calories and excess calories leads to more weight. However, if you are having hypoglycemic episodes then you need to log them in your glucose logs along with your glucose levels, meals and activities. Then on your regular and frequent visits to your endo or diabetic educator / advisor / dietician, your TDD ( Total Daily Dose ), basal dose and carb to insulin ratios ( there could be separate ratios for each type of meal ) will be adjusted till you have the best control without hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemic events means your treatments have not been adjusted to your current schedule. Insulin treatment is based on your estimated energy needs, not your food consumption, your energy needs. If the insulin rate required can not be prorated from measurements during a hospital stay then it is estimated the same way your required calories / EER ( Estimated Energy Requirements ) are, from your weight and BMI. Often your initial TDD would be your weight in pounds divided by 4 ( they may start with 80% of this to avoid hypos ). Half your TDD would be given as your basal dose, either once a day Lantus, Levemir or Degludec or twice a day NPH. Your carb to insulin ratio would initially be 500 / TDD for rapid acting insulin, 450 / TDD for regular type R insulin but these prescriptions are assuming an average daily schedule with average meals. You are not average, no one is average so these values are adjusted often weekly according to your detailed glucose logs which should also contain logs of what you ate, and what exercise or sport you did along with your glucose readings, any hypoglycemic events and the snacks you took should also be logged as well as how you felt ( tired, nervous, sad, happy, headaches, etc. ) and whether it's a work / school day or day off, whether or not you're on shift if you're a shift worker, etc. Often type 1 diabetics begin treatment in childhood and parents are initially given loose guidelines with high targets and if the logs and visits to the Doctor are not detailed or frequent, the numbers are brought to the full estimated TDD till the patient complains of hypoglycemia or high glucose levels. Do not think that how your insulin was managed through your childhood is how it should be managed through your life, there is far more to insulin management than what you've been given. You're replacing nature's finely tuned feedback system with a coarse trial and error game of hot and cold with the danger of low glucose being immediate and severe while the dangers of high glucose being progressive and long term. You can help this process with a detailed glucose log, regular meals both in carbs and time and regularly scheduled exercise. The regularity of your schedule helps them match the insulin to your needs. You should not be having hypoglycemia if your insulin treatment is adjusted properly to your daily schedule. I used the Hershey mini-chocolates when I have a hypo, kept a bunch in a goldfish jar on my desk. The nurses at the hospital said they were too slow but I found them just right ( I get hospitalized infrequently for heart failure ). Problem is, co-workers would eat them as I rarely hypo ( haven't for almost ten years and I manage a 6.8% A1c so far ) and then replace them with candies they bought. I wouldn't know who did it so I would have to tell people whenever I could to leave the candy buying to me as they are for medical emergencies. I believe it was the night shift that pilfered my candy.

Stephenie Stephenie
Forget anything you have ever been told about Diabetes. And get this - it has nothing to do with insulin, exercise, diet or anything else you've heard in the past. It's all based on latest breakthrough research that Big Pharma is going Stir Crazy to hide from you. Visit here : https://tr.im/Oczqa to find out what all the fuss is about.
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Quianna Quianna
thats funny i thought type 2 was for people who were mostly over weight. im a type 1 and tryin to gain weight but you do need to talk with a dietician For the best answers, search on this site https://smarturl.im/aDBhW
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Meggie Meggie
Carbs have nothing to do with gaining muscle mass. Protein is what you need. I would think that you should also be restricting your protein intake as I have also been told to do because I am also type II.
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Meggie Originally Answered: How to lose weight with type ONE diabetes and hypothyroidism?
Hey there! I am in the same boat as you. I also have hypothyroidism and type ONE. While weight loss has been excruciatingly hard, I can offer some tips that I have been doing that have helped me slowly but surely get on the fast track to losing some weight. 1. Take a multivitamin: Our bodies are always fighting off so much. If you take a vitamin, you will ensure that your body will be getting the vitamins and minerals it needs to fight off infection and allow your body MORE energy to do other things, such as losing weight. Look for multivitamins that promote a health heart and strong bones, as well as a good immune system. 2. Count your calories: This is hard, but when there is a will, there is a way. Ever look on the nutrition facts of food and note the servings? Follow that! Record your total calories, fat, sodium, etc. Keep a journal and do this. I started out by just recording what I ate in a normal day, evaluating it (weaknesses: eat too big portions, not enough meat, too much bread/sugar, etc) and then seeing what I can do to improve it. Try to keep your calories to about 2,300 per day, and then whittle it down. I'm currently at 2,245 at the most per day, and I'm noting a change in my energy. 3. EXERCISE: Speaking of energy, hypothyroidism simply kills your metabolism with an AK-47. :( RIght here, you just need a little more willpower. Think of living longer. At least that's what I do. Don't use elevators: instead, use the stairs. Walk a little more than you need to. Have Nintendo Wii? Do WiiFit. It works out muscles you never thought you could work out! Walk around your neighborhood every day. Go to a track at a school and walk the curves and jog the straights for thirty minutes to an hour. I totally understand taht your energy will deter you from doing this, but even a little effort should help. 4. Stay happy! SOmething you love to do that doesn't compromise your health or well being? Indulge in it! I like to draw and sew among other things. If you keep your feelings and personality up, then you can do all i have listed above and more. 5. Go to sleep on time. Yes this is very important. Your sleep helps regulate SO much. While ALL are important, the integral plan is to choose a method and STICK WITH IT! Watch your portions, and work out every day for at least thirty minutes. Take that vitamin, get some sleep, and remember to do something you enjoy. From one hypobetes dealer to another, I HAVE FAITH IN YOU! And a last note: I've been doing this very method for the past week and a half, and I lost four pounds. Just keep going, and with a little patience you'll get there!

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