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Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!?

Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!? Topic: Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!?
November 14, 2019 / By Netta
Question: I have been tested for everything under the sun. The only thing that has come back elevated in my blood work is CRP & Sed Rate. I hurt so bad all over. My muscles feel like rubberbands and my hands and legs start to draw in. I had a muscle biopsy done and it came back normal. I start hurting so bad all over I can't stand the pain and have to go to the hospital. I react VERY well to Medrol/Prednisone but can't go over 4 days without taking it or I relaps. The problem there is I have borderline osteoporosis. I think I am going to go to an Immuneologist. I have been to a Rheumatologist, Osteopedic Dr., & Neurologist. I haven't been back to my Neuro yet, since I got the results of my biop Tuesday. My MRI (brain) showed a little scaring but not enough that my Neuro was worried(MS). So, my question is? Could I still have Lupus even though my ANA's are negative? If not, what can it be? I'm so tired of hurting! Some Dr's look at me like I just want pain meds! I hate taking meds! I have all the symptoms of fibro. My Rheumy said she believes I have it but also another underlying condition. My Neuro said the white scarring on my brain was equal to someone who has sever migrains, but, I don't have migrains. The reason I went ahead & got the brain MRI is I thought I my actually be havimg a light stroke. It was horrible lightning-like pains going threw the side of my head and face. A few days later it came back. We figured it is T.N. paines b/c applying make-up or anything of that nature sets it off. LMBO!! I'm 5' 4" and weigh 130 lbs. and just had a baby 6 months ago. I'm not overweight. You didn't bother me suggesting it.
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Best Answers: Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!?

Luella Luella | 4 days ago
In general both ESR and CRP measure the increase in inflammatory generated proteins. CRP is a direct measurement of C-reactive protein. ESR indirectly measures many proteins associated with inflammation. Your elevated CRP and Sed rates are probably indicative of your osteoporosis. But, they are commonly ordered tests for arthritis. What about fibromyalgia? Do these symptoms sound like you: Pain: The most prominent symptom of fibromyalgia is pain. Unlike arthritis, the discomfort is not in the joints but in the muscles and ligaments. The pain is commonly located in the neck, shoulders, back, and hips. The tenderness is worse in the mornings and has been described as flulike, burning, throbbing, aching, or stabbing. Fatigue: This is said to occur so commonly that some doctors think fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are the same disease. The severity of the fatigue can range from mild to incapacitating. In its worse form, fatigue can be so debilitating that some people have trouble keeping their jobs. No amount of sleep at night or rest during the day is helpful. "Fibrofog": Another common symptom is a mental haziness some people call fibrofog. This refers to the inability to concentrate, memory loss, and depression that occurs with fibromyalgia. Other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia are headaches, nervousness, numbness, dizziness, and intestinal disturbances Of course, you may not have all these symptoms. Muscular pain is key. IF this sounds like you, there are some tests you can undergo. A new blood test involving antipolymer antibodies has been developed. Approximately 50% of patients with fibromyalgia have these antibodies. This blood test provides objective evidence to identify a subgroup of people with fibromyalgia. To reduce misdiagnosis and confusion, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recognized the need to establish a clear definition and guidelines too. The diagnostic criteria includes 2 basic requirements. The first is the presence of pain in all 4 quadrants of the body, as well as in the axial skeleton on a more-or-less continuous basis for at least 3 months. The pain often is described as widespread or global. The second criterion is the presence of at least 11 of 18 anatomically specific tender points. Maybe talk to your rheumatologist about this? Or, perhaps an immunologist? What of the scarring from the MRI though? That's weird. What kind of explanation did you get for that? Nothing to worry about, but what is it? Were they PWM (periventricular) white lesions? This is common in MS, as you get older, vitamin B6 deficiency, and small strokes. Have you had your B6 levels tested? IF your neuro said it was "nothing to worry about" type of thing, what about, a B6 or migraine hypothesis to explain those... EDIT: Perhaps the "underlying conditon" is indeed related to fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia can be associated with many other conditions. Note that osteoarthritis is one of these: Irritable bowel syndrome Tension/migraine headaches Dysmenorrhea Nondermatomal paresthesia Temporomandibular joint syndrome Mitral valve prolapse Interstitial cystitis, vulvodynia Female urethral syndrome Vulvar vestibulitis Hypermobility syndrome Restless-legs syndrome Allergies Multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome Enthesopathies Vestibular disorders Esophageal dysmotility Various ocular disturbances Anxiety disorders Pulmonary symptoms Raynaud phenomenon Thyroid dysfunction Lyme disease Silicone breast implant syndrome Rheumatoid arthritis Systemic lupus erythematosus Sjögren syndrome Infections **Osteoarthritis Chronic fatigue syndrome Carpal tunnel syndrome Hyperventilation Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) Sleep disorders Depression Myofascial pain syndrome Sleep disorders Maybe one of your doctors could prescribe some medications to treat the hypothesis of fibromyalgia to see if you feel better. Diagnosis by treatment. CNS agents, like a dopamine agonist, antidepressants (that at low doses provide pain relief and improve sleep--e.g., amnitriptyline), muscle relaxants, or anticonvulsants, are the most successful pharmacotherapies. A malic acid and magnesium combination may be helpful. What about physical therapy (by someone with expertise in the treatment of soft tissue disorders)? Or, trigger-point injection. This one is suppose to provide mechanical disruption (myolysis) of the trigger point. Disruption leads to reduction of pain and an increase in ROM, exercise tolerance, and circulation. In terms of the white matter lesions, perhaps it is aura without migraine. From what I understand, not all migraine disorders are accompanied by pain. I would suspect this MRI finding is separate from the pain you've been experiencing though. IF trigeminal neuralgia (TN) has been confirmed, there are medications and surgery as a last resort. I think anti-epileptics are the mainstay. The most commonly used are carbamazepine and phenytoin.
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Luella Originally Answered: Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!?
In general both ESR and CRP measure the increase in inflammatory generated proteins. CRP is a direct measurement of C-reactive protein. ESR indirectly measures many proteins associated with inflammation. Your elevated CRP and Sed rates are probably indicative of your osteoporosis. But, they are commonly ordered tests for arthritis. What about fibromyalgia? Do these symptoms sound like you: Pain: The most prominent symptom of fibromyalgia is pain. Unlike arthritis, the discomfort is not in the joints but in the muscles and ligaments. The pain is commonly located in the neck, shoulders, back, and hips. The tenderness is worse in the mornings and has been described as flulike, burning, throbbing, aching, or stabbing. Fatigue: This is said to occur so commonly that some doctors think fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome are the same disease. The severity of the fatigue can range from mild to incapacitating. In its worse form, fatigue can be so debilitating that some people have trouble keeping their jobs. No amount of sleep at night or rest during the day is helpful. "Fibrofog": Another common symptom is a mental haziness some people call fibrofog. This refers to the inability to concentrate, memory loss, and depression that occurs with fibromyalgia. Other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia are headaches, nervousness, numbness, dizziness, and intestinal disturbances Of course, you may not have all these symptoms. Muscular pain is key. IF this sounds like you, there are some tests you can undergo. A new blood test involving antipolymer antibodies has been developed. Approximately 50% of patients with fibromyalgia have these antibodies. This blood test provides objective evidence to identify a subgroup of people with fibromyalgia. To reduce misdiagnosis and confusion, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) recognized the need to establish a clear definition and guidelines too. The diagnostic criteria includes 2 basic requirements. The first is the presence of pain in all 4 quadrants of the body, as well as in the axial skeleton on a more-or-less continuous basis for at least 3 months. The pain often is described as widespread or global. The second criterion is the presence of at least 11 of 18 anatomically specific tender points. Maybe talk to your rheumatologist about this? Or, perhaps an immunologist? What of the scarring from the MRI though? That's weird. What kind of explanation did you get for that? Nothing to worry about, but what is it? Were they PWM (periventricular) white lesions? This is common in MS, as you get older, vitamin B6 deficiency, and small strokes. Have you had your B6 levels tested? IF your neuro said it was "nothing to worry about" type of thing, what about, a B6 or migraine hypothesis to explain those... EDIT: Perhaps the "underlying conditon" is indeed related to fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia can be associated with many other conditions. Note that osteoarthritis is one of these: Irritable bowel syndrome Tension/migraine headaches Dysmenorrhea Nondermatomal paresthesia Temporomandibular joint syndrome Mitral valve prolapse Interstitial cystitis, vulvodynia Female urethral syndrome Vulvar vestibulitis Hypermobility syndrome Restless-legs syndrome Allergies Multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome Enthesopathies Vestibular disorders Esophageal dysmotility Various ocular disturbances Anxiety disorders Pulmonary symptoms Raynaud phenomenon Thyroid dysfunction Lyme disease Silicone breast implant syndrome Rheumatoid arthritis Systemic lupus erythematosus Sjögren syndrome Infections **Osteoarthritis Chronic fatigue syndrome Carpal tunnel syndrome Hyperventilation Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) Sleep disorders Depression Myofascial pain syndrome Sleep disorders Maybe one of your doctors could prescribe some medications to treat the hypothesis of fibromyalgia to see if you feel better. Diagnosis by treatment. CNS agents, like a dopamine agonist, antidepressants (that at low doses provide pain relief and improve sleep--e.g., amnitriptyline), muscle relaxants, or anticonvulsants, are the most successful pharmacotherapies. A malic acid and magnesium combination may be helpful. What about physical therapy (by someone with expertise in the treatment of soft tissue disorders)? Or, trigger-point injection. This one is suppose to provide mechanical disruption (myolysis) of the trigger point. Disruption leads to reduction of pain and an increase in ROM, exercise tolerance, and circulation. In terms of the white matter lesions, perhaps it is aura without migraine. From what I understand, not all migraine disorders are accompanied by pain. I would suspect this MRI finding is separate from the pain you've been experiencing though. IF trigeminal neuralgia (TN) has been confirmed, there are medications and surgery as a last resort. I think anti-epileptics are the mainstay. The most commonly used are carbamazepine and phenytoin.
Luella Originally Answered: Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!?
This Site Might Help You. RE: Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!? I have been tested for everything under the sun. The only thing that has come back elevated in my blood work is CRP & Sed Rate. I hurt so bad all over. My muscles feel like rubberbands and my hands and legs start to draw in. I had a muscle biopsy done and it came back normal. I start hurting so bad...

Kayleah Kayleah
This Site Might Help You. RE: Lupus, MS, MCTD? I have neg ANA's, can I still have it? I think I do!? I have been tested for everything under the sun. The only thing that has come back elevated in my blood work is CRP & Sed Rate. I hurt so bad all over. My muscles feel like rubberbands and my hands and legs start to draw in. I had a muscle biopsy done and it came back normal. I start hurting so bad...
👍 60 | 👎 -5

Hope Hope
Unlikely. By all you say I suspect most of your problems come from severe overweight. If wrong I'm sorry.
👍 57 | 👎 -14

Hope Originally Answered: I have lupus. Is lupus heriditery, and should i have my children checked?
My sister is a carrier but does not exhibit any of the symptoms. She found out when she went through in-vitro pregnancy. She had to have the boys tested after they were born.

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