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I have a tumor on my thyroid gland , could this be related to low red blood cell and high w.b.cell? No HIV?

I have a tumor on my thyroid gland , could this be related to low red blood cell and high w.b.cell? No HIV? Topic: I have a tumor on my thyroid gland , could this be related to low red blood cell and high w.b.cell? No HIV?
June 25, 2019 / By Alisa
Question: no infections I'm not and have not been sick for a long time. Anyone with some good practical reasons or help on this issue,I would greatly appreciate ! thanks in advance,Jeannie Sorry I didn't tell the whole story,(too long) 1 yr ago I had an mri for discs being out of place the mri tech found a benign hemangeioma in T2 vertebra. 1year later (last week) same mri done they found that it spread to the right pedicle as well as the rt thyroid gland . this time the mri tech's didn't refer to the benign issue.I wont be able to see my neurologist until the 7th ,or my internist who seems to be the one concerned about this matter for 3 more weeks. I have O pos. blood so every time I'm due to give blood I do(it will help anyone)when surgeons don't have enough time to do a blood typing ,as my blood can go to anyone,very important to me to help! red cross only allows blood donation once every 2 mo. Of course I donated so yesterday I went to donate again,they said I couldn't ,WHAT? their requirerments are on RBC counts are 12.5-19 ,and I was a 10 so in 2mo. my red blood cell count droped min. 2.5 in 2 mo. so truley the only thing I can do is to wait for those dr's apps.
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Best Answers: I have a tumor on my thyroid gland , could this be related to low red blood cell and high w.b.cell? No HIV?

Ulrick Ulrick | 5 days ago
I have a cyst on my thyroid . I get it excised then it comes back. I do have an auto immune disease (lupus) though but my white count have been low for the last 3 months....I have had the cyst 2 yrs. My cyst gives me no problems and since mine comes back even when drained, I JUST LEAVE IT ALONE.. Best of luck So sorry to hear about your troubles, I hope you "get well soon" and thanks for being a donor..
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Ulrick Originally Answered: High white blood cell count for a toddler?
A high white blood cell count is usually indicative of a disease of bone marrow, causing abnormally high production of white blood cells, an immune system disorder that increases white blood cell production, or a reaction to a drug that enhances white blood cell production. Specific causes of high white blood cell count include: * Acute lymphocytic leukemia * Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) * Allergy, especially severe allergic reactions * Chronic lymphocytic leukemia * Chronic myelogenous leukemia * Drugs, such as corticosteroids and epinephrine * Hairy cell leukemia * Measles * Myelofibrosis * Other bacterial infections * Other viral infections * Polycythemia vera * Rheumatoid arthritis * Smoking * Stress, such as severe emotional or physical stress * Tissue damage, such as from burns * Tuberculosis * Whooping cough Obviously some of these wouldn't possibly apply to your child. More than likely it's a viral infection of some sort that just needs to run its course. I went through a period of about 3 mos last year when my ASO titer level was elevated and I kept getting unexplained fevers (1-2 per week) and the doctors couldn't explain why. As suddenly as it started, it stopped and my levels went away. They figured it was viral. Good luck!!
Ulrick Originally Answered: High white blood cell count for a toddler?
This Site Might Help You. RE: High white blood cell count for a toddler? My 20 month old had to go to the doctors on April 1st for a high fever of 103. The pediatrician couldnt find anything wrong with her and took her blood count since she just got off an antibiotic about a week beforehand. It was slightly elevated to 13,000, the normal is 10,000. She fevered for about...

Riordan Riordan
When you have nodules on your thyroid it means that your body is out of balance and full of toxins. Head to the herb shop!
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Meshech Meshech
Do you have any Auto-immune diseases? that can cause it. tumors could be caused by anything. diet, exposure to hazardous chemicals or materials, to genetics and unknown factors. if you live near any factories or chemical plants...that could be the cause. get tested for the genetic mutation of cancer cells. BTW- is it cancer or binine?
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Meshech Originally Answered: What are the causes of a low Red Blood Cell Count? My Doctor has already ruled out Vitamin D and B12 and Iron?
Image by Flickr.com, courtesy of Nathan Forget Aspects A complete blood count determines the number of four separate types of blood cells or proteins in circulating blood: red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and hemoglobin. The test also determines the exact proportion of the blood's red blood cell to plasma ratio, a number that is known as the hematocrit. A decreased population in the blood of any of the four blood cells or proteins can be caused by a variety of disorders, and gives physicians a starting point for further diagnosis and treatment. Low red blood cell count A low red blood cell count is most often caused by conditions that disrupt the body's ability to produce properly functioning red blood cells. These conditions can involve a lack of iron, as in iron deficiency anemia, or can be caused by disorders that suppress the bone marrow's ability to produce the cells, such as kidney disease, pernicious anemia or aplastic anemia. Pregnancy, excessive blood loss from cancer or internal ulcers, and genetic disorders such as sickle cell anemia also cause red blood cell counts to drop. Low white blood cell count A low white blood cell count can be the result of bone marrow damaging disorders such as cancer; immune diseases, such as HIV, AIDS or rheumatoid arthritis that target and destroy white blood cells; or drugs and medications that damage the bone marrow's blood cell producing capabilities. Low white blood cells counts can also be the result of inheritable disorders, but this is much less common. Low platelet count A low platelet count in the blood---a condition known as thrombocytopenia---is usually caused by either a severe decrease in the amount of platelets being produced by the bone marrow or a medical disorder that involves the destruction or abnormally rapid use of the platelets. Conditions that can result in a low platelet count include severe bacterial or viral infections, autoimmune diseases, certain types of cancer and genetic disorders. Low hemoglobin count Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that is responsible for carrying oxygen. Hemoglobin and red blood cell counts go hand-in-hand: if one is low, it is indicative of a decrease in the other. Since A comprehensive blood count---more commonly known as a complete blood count, or CBC---is a What Are the Causes of Low Blood Count? Read more: What Are the Causes of Low Blood Count? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5565254_causes... blood test used to determine the amounts of each specific type of blood cell present in circulating blood. A low blood count means that one or more of the blood cell types is present in lower numbers than usual. This decrease is often caused by an underlying medical condition or problem. Read more: What Are the Causes of Low Blood Count? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5565254_causes... hemoglobin is dependent on iron to function properly, iron deficiencies in the body can contribute to a low hemoglobin count. Other low hemoglobin count causes are similar to those of low red blood cell count causes---blood loss, autoimmune disorders, medications that disrupt the function of the bone marrow and disorders such as cancer or kidney disease Read more: What Are the Causes of Low Blood Count? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5565254_causes...

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